Choosing the right frame for your oil painting - a few tips

  22/11/2018     Comments (0)

Let the painting guide you. Do you want to frame a Van Gogh replica or another oil painting? The tips in this video may help you selecting the right frame. .videoWrapper { position: relative; padding-bottom: 51%; /* 16:9 */ padding-top: 25px; height: 0; } .videoWrapper iframe { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

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The emotional content from within.

  Arshak Andriasov     02/01/2018     Comments (0)

While Vincent Van Gogh's Irises bring out a variety of ingenious techniques, the emotional content from within is obviously solemn. After entering an asylum in Saint-Rémy, France, Mr. Van Gogh chose to work on these Irises within the first week of his stay. Hand-painted reproduction in oil on canvas of Van Gogh's Irises Vincent Van Gogh created this drowning with sorrow painting from the asylum's garden. This creation is not a cry of emphatic pain. Yet, an inner disappointment seems to enrapture this wonderful man. How could it not? A bright and shining enthusiasm from the genius was dashed by people who could not see his wonderful vision. This ability to create beauty for others would have worked if he were surrounded by likeminded, enthusiastic personalities. Sadly, in this world, there never seems...

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Walking around the café terrace at night.

  Arshak Andriasov     07/12/2017     Comments (0)

Can you imagine how wonderful it must feel to know that anyone in the world could stand in the very spot that Vincent Van Gogh was creating this painting? So many enlightening conversations must have taken place in this coffee house.   Hand-painted reproduction in oil on canvas of Van Gogh's Cafe Terrace at Night. Painted in 1888, the Café Terrace at Night was one of his first set of creations done in Arles. The café still exists, but under the name Café van Gogh. A wonderful gesture done to help bring an imaginative painting into a reality of everyday life. Vincent’s excited inspiration was in full bloom. The flurry with which Mr. Van Gogh created this composition was in a major contrast with the seemingly nocturnal setting. Van Gogh wrote to his sister: "Here you have a night...

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The Magical Optimism From The Asylum Room.

  Arshak Andriasov     07/12/2017     Comments (0)

Probably the most famous painting created by Vincent Van Gogh, The Starry Night is a dimmed view from the window of his asylum room. Due to the consistent emotional torment from people, Van Gogh checked himself into Saint-Paul Asylum, where nature brought him inspiration to create again. The Starry Night Not A Failure. Painted in 1889, Mr. Van Gogh called The Starry Night a failure, writing to his brother Theo: "All in all the only things I consider a little good in it are the Wheatfield, the Mountain, the Orchard, the Olive trees with the blue hills and the Portrait and the Entrance to the quarry, and the rest says nothing to me.”   Hand-painted reproduction in oil on canvas of Van Gogh's Starry Night Sadly, Theo did not try to dissuade his opinion: “I clearly sense what preoccupies you...

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The inner vibrancy within the Willows at Sunset.

  Arshak Andriasov     06/11/2017     Comments (0)

Painted in 1888, Vincent Van Gogh delivers a heightened sense of inner vibrancy within his Willows at Sunset. The ability to create an energetic impact, while also being able to have a sense of subdued harmony, makes Mr. Van Gogh a true genius.   If you notice closely, Vincent Van Gogh employs the brushstrokes in a mostly vertical style. The sun, which is clearly revered in this painting, does not participate in this artistic technique. Bringing darker tones from the ground towards a bright sun has deep meaning. One can interpret the Willows at Sunset as a person's journey through life. While a meandering darkness prevails from the ground, Mr. Van Gogh interweaves our joys through lighter colors in between. A sense of hope for a brighter ascension towards the sky ultimately decides this miraculous composition, but...

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